Math Education

General collection of strategies for math education.

Expectation #1 – Students can learn a lot by filling in the logical details of the presented proofs - See more at: http://blogs.ams.org/matheducation/2015/02/10/mathematics-professors-and-mathematics-majors-expectations-of-lectures-in-advanced-mathematics/#more-631

Examples of visualizations for math concepts: http://www.levitylab.com/blog/2013/06/simulation-for-games-class/

Suggested to me: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED472048.pdf

The first of these heuristics is reinvention through progressive mathematization. According to thehttp://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED472048.pdf, the students should be given the opportunity to experience a process similar to the process by which the mathematics was invented

Similar: http://www.chris-granger.com/2015/01/26/coding-is-not-the-new-literacy/

Toread: http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-1068/paper-l08.pdf

Analogy as core of cognition: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8m7lFQ3njk

Related email reply:

Hey Minh,

Thanks for reaching out, glad you’re enjoying the site. I’m hoping to write more, but check out this article:

http://betterexplained.com/articles/adept-method/

That’s the general approach I use to breaking down new concepts. For a topic like linear algebra, I’ll start getting a list of formal concepts (from Wikipedia, i.e. matrix, determinant, eigenvector) then start searching forums (reddit, math overflow) for analogies. I try to come up with intuitive ways to describe the technical term and create diagrams/examples that help.

For example, I came up with an analogy of a matrix being like a “spreadsheet” (which most of us are familiar with), then we find ways to update the spreadsheet with new info. It’s not official, but it helps me grok what’s happening. You can see that article here:

http://betterexplained.com/articles/linear-algebra-guide/